76 Groups of Anglicans

Google Ordinariate Map Jan 29 2011 76 Groups of Anglicans

The Google Ordinariate Map as of this morning, with a bit of continental drift for the islands.

The groups continue to group.  As of today on the Google Map, with thanks as always to Shane Schaetzel of St. Augustine of Canterbury in Springfield, I get the following counts by country:

Canada:  29

United States:  32

United Kingdom:  13

The UK groups are popping up like mushrooms and Ordinariate Portal is now listing 15 groups there, which brings us to a grand total of

76 GROUPS OF ANGLICANS

Three months ago today, we had only a U.S. map with a count of 19 groups.  Six weeks ago, the Canadian portion of the map came online and the count jumped to 46.  This week, we have added the UK, and the States and Canada have added 15 pins in the meantime.

Give thanks, keep working, and don't forget to send along the good news!

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28 thoughts on “76 Groups of Anglicans

  1. "Continent drift for the islands", indeed! I have never been so close to Bermuda since my family flew there from New York on B.O.A.C. in the spring of '65. Wait, let me get my binoculars. I think I may be able to see it from here!

    LBW +
    Holy Cross, Hawai`i

      1. On the contrary, we thank you for including Hawai`i in so many previous maps, even though the larger-scale map made for a congestion of the pins on the North American continent. Hawai`i's move from the Pacific to the Atlantic has had the salutary effect of bringing us closer to Rome. And, I hope the British, with their bad weather, especially at this time of year, will indeed consider Hawai`i as an alternative tourist destination, not only to Penzance, but also to Florida and the Caribbean.

    1. Guzmang1,

      Has the TAC in Puerto Rico not made its intentions known?

      I anticipate that the diocese of the Traditional Anglican Communion (TAC) in Puerto Rico will request the erection of an ordinariate for Puerto Rico when they are ready. Puerto Rico has a separate conference of bishops from that of the United States, so it will have a separate ordinariate.

      Norm.

      1. "Puerto Rico has a separate conference of bishops from that of the United States, so it will have a separate ordinariate."

        While that may happen and seems to fit with what is stated in the Apostolic Constitution, hasn't there been some flexibility shown for areas that may be too small for their own Ordinariate being included in another? I'm thinking there was some indication that Japan may be part of an Australian Ordinariate, though I would expect Japan has their own separate bishops' conference.

        1. Daniel,

          While that may happen and seems to fit with what is stated in the Apostolic Constitution, hasn't there been some flexibility shown for areas that may be too small for their own Ordinariate being included in another? I'm thinking there was some indication that Japan may be part of an Australian Ordinariate, though I would expect Japan has their own separate bishops' conference.

          There was a comment in a pastoral communication of 30 November 2010 by Archbishop John Hepworth, Primate of the Traditional Anglican Communion (TAC), stating that Nippon Kristos Sei Ko Kai is "involved in" the implementation of an ordinariate for Australia, but I have not seen anything from any Catholic authority indicating official dispensation from the norm that each ordinariate must be within the territory of an episcopal conference.

          But in any case, the same pastoral communication states that Bishop Garcia of Puerto Rico has petitioned for a separate ordinariate for his province of TAC. Thus, it appears that there will be a separate ordinariate for Puerto Rico when the dust settles.

          Norm.

  2. Are there other ACA parishes which may still be coming on board, or will we be looking for these numbers to stabilize for the time being?

    1. With the actual erection of the Ordinariate you will see other groups announcing. Some ACA parishes are split, and unless the pro-Ordinariate members are a super-majority of the congregation, they are basically stuck in a holding pattern. There is nothing to do except wait and pray.

      The pattern in England will be repeated, I think: groups forming anew according to geographic location around leaders that already live there.

      There are priests without congregations and congregations without priests, and the Ordinary will have to sort this all out with the data from Cardinal Wuerl's office.

      1. You wrote: There are priests without congregations and congregations without priests, and the Ordinary will have to sort this all out with the data from Cardinal Wuerl's office.

        Canonically, you are absolutely correct that the ordinary will have to "sort this out" because the ordinary canonically erect each parish and appoint a pastor thereof (or make other provision for leadership and sacramental ministry) as each group enters into the full communion of the Catholic Church within the ordinariate. Looking at the published timeline for the receptions and ordinations in England and Wales, it appears that Fr. Newton has two options.

        >> 1. He could canonically erect parishes as groups come into full communion and appoint an "administrator" for each parish, deferring appointment of pastors until the former Anglican clergy entering the ordinariate receive ordination. In this scenario, the administrators could be either lay people (including the prospective pastors), with the pastors of the geographical parishes supplying sacramental ministry as provided by Section 2 of Article 14 of the Complementary Norms, or, by written agreement with the local diocesan bishops, the pastors of the diocesan parishes.

        >> 2. He could delay canonical erection of parishes until the ordination of their prospective pastors, then appoint a pastor upon canonical erection of each parish.

        But in any case, I expect that he will appoint the current pastor of each group as the pastor of the respective parish of the ordinariate, to maintain its continuity as a community. The only exceptions will be in cases in which pastors elect not to enter the full communion of the Catholic Church with the members of their congregation and in which the Catholic Church does not immediately accept a pastor for ordination due to irregular marriages or other impediments. If I read the tea leaves correctly, the decrees canonically erecting the anticipated parishes and letters appointing their pastors probably are already prepared and awaiting signature when the time comes.

        In the case of the Anglican Church in America (ACA), I expect that the bishops of that body will make an effort to reassign its clergy to provide a presbyter of the ACA coming into full communion with the group from each parish before the parish groups begin the formal stage of formation and discernment under Catholic pastors. Thus, as a practical matter, there won't be much for the ordinary to sort out.

        Norm.

  3. Are any of the US "groups" in fact the house chapels of clergy who assist at other parishes? This is the case for at least four of the Canadian points, which skews the numbers somewhat IMHO.

    1. The following Canadian TAC missions are indeed house chapels or very small numerically:
      St. Thomas More: house chapel
      St. Francis Mission: house chapel
      St. Augustine of Canterbury: house chapel
      Chapel of the Annunciation: house chapel
      Chapel of Our Lady of the Sign: house chapel
      St. Patrick: attendance of +/- 1 or 2 communicants
      Chapel of Our Lady & St. Martin: house chapel
      St. Michael & All Angels: usual attendance +/- 5 or 6 communicants
      Christ Church Mission: house chapel
      Two of the cathedral parishes have split: so that St. Mark's Victoria is now an APCK parish, and St. Matthew, Ottawa is now ACC-OP.

      1. So, in addition to the seven churches that the Anglican Catholic Church of Canada owns, its priests or laity will be bringing an additional seven house chapels that they own privately into the Canadian ordinariate. That is great. When added to the several churches, chapels and rooms that the ACCC has rental agreements in place for, it means the Canadian ordinariate will be in a much superior situation to the English ordinariate in getting started.

        1. And one should add in St. John the Evangelist, Calgary, an Anglican Church of Canada parish with 60+ communicants and buildings that they are negotiating with the diocese for.

            1. Mind you, if we in the ACCC enter the ordinariate as we pray we shall, as a church as a whole, then the number of Canadian "groups" that count those parishes really should be just one…

            2. Fr. Sean,

              You wrote: Mind you, if we in the ACCC enter the ordinariate as we pray we shall, as a church as a whole, then the number of Canadian "groups" that count those parishes really should be just one…

              I think that Archbishop Hepworth and the rest of the leadership of the Traditional Anglican Communion (TAC) originally envisioned that each of their provinces would become an ordinariate and its dioceses, if more than one, would become deaneries thereof.

              Would that it were so simple. While canonically possible, the maintenance of separate bodies for those coming from different places is not a very Catholic way of doing things. Rather, those coming to each ordinariate from different bodies must embrace one another as fellow members of the one Body of Christ, and thus must come together at the same eucharistic table under the pastoral governance of a common ordinary. This means that some parishes of the ordinariate may embrace two or more groups coming from different bodies in the same geographical area. Where there are two or more "pins" practically on top of one another on the map, the respective groups typically will form one parish of the ordinariate. The groups whose "pins" are by themselves will form separate parishes or quasi-parishes, but even they may receive many indivicuals who have entered the full communion of the Catholic Church individually rather than as a group as new members of their congregations.

              Also, from the standpoint of the process of reception, the congregations of the Anglican Catholic Church of Canada (ACCC) are geographically dispersed in a way that will require a local pastor to prepare and receive each parish separately. It's also quite possible that parishes will be received into full communion at different times due to logistics and scheduling issues. Thus, from a standpoint of the process of preparing and receiving parishes, each parish of the ACCC will be a separate group.

              And functionally, the present arrangement shows where parishes and quasi-parishes of the respective ordinariates will be.

              Norm.

      2. "Two of the cathedral parishes have split: so that St. Mark's Victoria is now an APCK parish, and St. Matthew, Ottawa is now ACC-OP."

        I wasn't going to comment on this contribution, but it's an interesting exercise in rhetoric: the way you describe the family troubles in the Victoria and Ottawa cathedrals seems to imply that those parishes no longer exist but are "now" part of other continuing bodies. Such rhetorical gracenotes suggest your own position on the ACCC and the Ordinariates, Fr. David.

        The cathedral parishes continue to be part of the Anglican Catholic Church of Canada, and are not "now" such-and-such parish of such-and-such other body. I cannot comment on Ottawa, but here in Victoria, after those who were not interested in the Ordinariate left the parish, our numbers over the summer (to judge by Sunday Masses) were down; however, our regular Sunday attendance has since returned to the same place it was before those who split (to use your term) departed.

        The splits were very sad affairs, and I for one mourn the faultlines in my parish family, but the cathedrals are not "now" other parishes.

  4. Does anyone know anything about the Atlanta Area AU Catholic Laity, Dunwoody, Georgia? I see the name pop up from time to time but I don't see any contacts, website, or other information on this group.

  5. I live in Rochester, NY. Are any of the contemplated Ordinariate parishes within reasonable driving distance from here (for folks in their 70s) ? We are lucky to make it to Fr. Bradford's AU parish once a year and have yet to manage a visit to Fr. Bergman's.
    Also, I have been reading some blogs about Rochester, NY, and I have a suggestion and an observation that can apply generally: First, send the names of any spiritually needy priests to the Handmaids of the Precious Blood in Jemez Springs, NM. They have an apostolate to pray for all priests and some associations to help them. They welcome names! Second, all the abuses in the liturgy, especially the most outlandish, should be seen as evidence of a Lack of Faith–same thing in Ang/Episc churches. I had a very wise pastor, now dead, who was chancellor of the diocese for years, who told me once that the believers would find each other, right across the denominations, just as the dissenters were surfacing in a kind of across the board community in the 70s and 80s. And he meant that the believers would get together Within The Church. We're seeing this now! Msgr. Eugene Kevane, late founder of the Notre Dame Pontifical Catechetical Institute (that has devolved into Christendom College's grad school), once told me, "Go where you see the signs of faith." THAT saves a lot of time and agony. Blessed be PBXVI for designing and establishing a way to allow the AU to flourish and grow. As an old convert (1960), my spirit would rejoice with more frequent AU Masses–if we could just GET TO THEM!
    Hopefully–Judy

    1. Unfortunately it would appear that the nearest parish to Rochester that will be entering an Ordinariate is over the border, St Edmund's in Waterloo, ON.

    2. Judy,

      You asked: I live in Rochester, NY. Are any of the contemplated Ordinariate parishes within reasonable driving distance from here (for folks in their 70s) ?

      The directory of the Diocese of the Northeast (DNE) of the Anglican Church in America (ACA), the province of the Traditional Anglican Communion for the United States, lists <a href="http://acanedio.org/parishes/HolyCross/index.shtml&quot; Holy Cross Anglican Church at 615 Bay Road, Webster, New York, as one of its parishes. Webster appears to be a suburb of Rochester on the map. I don't know this parish's intent with regard to entering the ordinariate, but you certainly could inquire of the pastor whether or not it is forming, or has formed, an ordinariate group.

      As an old convert (1960), my spirit would rejoice with more frequent AU Masses–if we could just GET TO THEM!

      In that case, the apostolic constitution Anglicanorum coetibus seems to permit you to join an ordinariate personally as soon as the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith establishes an ordinariate for the United States, even if it does not have a parish in your area, though you obviously would have to continue to attend mass at a diocesan parish or a clerical religious order until the ordinarate canonically erects a parish or a quasi-parish in your area. The only formality stated in the document appears to be that you "manifest" the desire to join the ordinariate in writing.

      Of course, the ordinariate would erect a parish or quasi-parish upon reception of a group from Holy Cross Anglican Church into full communion. If substantially the entire parish enters the ordinariate, it would retain its current parish facilities and probably its current pastor. If a significant number of members of this parish elect not to enter the ordinariate, they may well retain the facilities and the ordinariate probably would have to work with your diocesan bishop to identify suitable facilities for the new community. This could mean sharing facilities with another community for some period of time until the new parish has the resources to build its own facilities or the new parish could hit the jackpot by taking over the facilities of a parish that the bishop has recently suppressed.

      In your situation, it certainly would be appropriate to contact the pastor of Holy Cross Anglican Church, explain your situation, and inquire as to the intentions of his parish. If there's a group preparing to enter the ordinariate, it's not too early to begin building bonds with those who will be part of your future parish. You certainly could attend their services as an observer to get a sense of their worship, participate in their fellowship as a guest, assist in their program of formation in a capacity deemed appropriate by the Catholic pastor delegated to oversee it, and act as a canonical sponsor for the reception of some or all of the members into the full communion of the Catholic Church. Such involvment obviously would give you an opportunity to build relationships with the members of the community in anticipation of their reception. Of course, it would be doubly inappropriate to receive the sacraments of that community before their reception into full communion, first, because the Catholic Church does not recognize the validity of those sacraments and, second, because such premature sacramental sharing would express a unity that does not yet exist.

      And of course, you will need to continue to assist in a Catholic mass on Sundays and holy days to fulfill the precepts of the church.

      You wrote: Second, all the abuses in the liturgy, especially the most outlandish, should be seen as evidence of a Lack of Faith–same thing in Ang/Episc churches.

      There is nothing anywhere in either the Codex Juris Canonici (Code of Canon Law) or liturgical law that obligates us, as Catholic Christians, to fulfill the precept of mass at a mass of our canonical parish. It's perfectly acceptable to assist in a mass at another parish, a house of a religious order, a chaplaincy (college campus, hospital, prison, etc.), for example, or even a congregation another rite within the Catholic Church, even on a habitual basis, if one finds that they provide the spiritual nourishment of the liturgy in a manner that's more in keeping with one's needs. Of course, you may need to do some "leg work" to explore what may be available in your area.

      Norm.

      1. I have been hearing that the pastor of that ACA parish in Webster, NY is a former Jesuit who [...] has effectively driven form the congregation those members who have declared themselves in favor of it.

      1. Judy,

        Yes, there is a group forming in Rochester, NY.

        For more information, please send an email to
        rochester.ordinariate@gmail.com

        We are still in the formation stage, but I can brief you on progress to date.

        In that case, please pass the information about your group to Bro. Stephen so he can add a "pin" for your group to the map!

        Norm.

  6. Norm, I fear you misapprehend my comment. I certainly do not advocate some sort of body within the Canadian Ordinariate reserved solely for the ACCC; you suspect me of deep absurdity! Of course the Ordinariate will be formed of people from different church bodies. My comment about the ACCC parishes marked on the map really being *one* stems from my belief in our diocese being as much a "group of Anglicans" as any single parish seeking entry into the Ordinariate. We sought corporate reunion, after all.

    Until the reality in Canada unfolds, whatever that may be, I shall trust that a "group" as a unit of measurement can encompass a nation-wide diocese. Neither you nor I know any different at the moment (shrug).

    1. Fr. Sean,

      You wrote: I fear you misapprehend my comment. I certainly do not advocate some sort of body within the Canadian Ordinariate reserved solely for the ACCC; you suspect me of deep absurdity! Of course the Ordinariate will be formed of people from different church bodies.

      Hmmm…

      I tried to take your words at what seemed to be their face value, but obviously misunderstood what you meant. But in any case, I'm probably not alone so the clarification should be helpful.

      You wrote: My comment about the ACCC parishes marked on the map really being *one* stems from my belief in our diocese being as much a "group of Anglicans" as any single parish seeking entry into the Ordinariate. We sought corporate reunion, after all.

      Yes, that's certainly a legitimate perspective. And in reality, it appears from the pins on the map that the ordinariate for Canada will consist predominantly of the parishes of the Anglican Catholic Church of Canada (ACCC), so that may well be the result at the end of the day. There are only a couple pins for non-ACCC parishes, and I suspect that those groups probably could just as easily join ACCC if the ordinariate were not to come into being.

      That said, I sincerely doubt that the whole ACCC will assemble somewhere (Toronto?) for official reception into the full communion of the Catholic Church (and the ordinariate) as a single group, as this seems impracticable due to the distances involved and the cost of travel. Rather, it seems much more likely that the members of the ACCC will enter the Catholic Church in smaller groups that, in most cases, will substantially consist of their current local congregations (or at least those of their current congregations who are entering the ordinariate), and that they also will do their preparatory formation programs in those smaller groups. Further, I think we can reasonably foresee that the receptions probably will take place at different times, even if by only a few hours or a few days, due to scheduling issues. I suppose this technically means that each congregation before the last will detach from what's left of the ACCC to enter the ordinariate and reconnect with those that will have done so before it to await those who do so after it, with the larger "group of groups" being substantially restored, with a few new additions, at the end of the process.

      Norm.

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